6 Things to Know When Selecting a Complementary Health Practitioner

6 Things to Know When Selecting a Complementary Health Practitioner

If you’re looking for a complementary health practitioner to help treat a medical problem, it is important to be as careful and thorough in your search as you are when looking for conventional care. ​ Here are some tips to help you in your search:​

But before doing so, you need to know what Complementary Health Approach is. You can do so here.

  1. A nearby hospital or medical school, professional organizations, state regulatory agencies or licensing boards, or even your health insurance provider may be helpful. Unfortunately, the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) cannot refer you to practitioners.​ 
  2. The credentials required for complementary health practitioners vary tremendously from state to state and from discipline to discipline. ​
    Once you have found a possible practitioner, here are some tips about deciding whether he or she is right for you.
  3. For safe, coordinated care, it’s important for all of the professionals involved in your health to communicate and cooperate.​
  4. Choose a practitioner who understands how to work with people with your specific needs, even if general well-being is your goal. And, remember that health conditions can affect the safety of complementary approaches; for example, if you have glaucoma, some yoga poses may not be safe for you.​
  5. Contact your health insurance provider and ask. Insurance plans differ greatly in what complementary health approaches they cover, and even if they cover a particular approach, restrictions may apply.​
  6. Keeping your health care providers fully informed helps you to stay in control and effectively manage your health.​

 

References:
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

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